Wellness in Wilderness

If you google the term ‘wellderness,’ you’ll find a couple of podcasts, and Mary Walsh’s website www.wellderness.org. It’s a website dedicated to the practice of feeling good in nature. I had never thought of this word until recently, and though it’s not a real word, what a perfect word to describe a concept we all know and understand?

autumn or spring, watching moody skies from a hottub is the perfect outdoor mindfulness practice

It is hard to ignore the good feeling that being out in nature gives us. It would be even more difficult to convince someone that going into the wilderness will make them feel bad. There are some intimidating qualities of the wilderness, especially in Iceland, like wide open spaces, hostile weather and the possibility of getting stuck or lost. But even the negative connotations of these experiences are sometimes seen as an exciting part of the adventure.

Riding Sprengisandur in August

There are different types of nature therapies and various ways to improve wellness in the outdoors. Mary talks about walking and cold water swimming as her two main approaches, and I wholeheartedly agree. Walking, running and any kind of swimming are my favourite and most frequent forms of exercise. To get further into the outdoors, long-distance hikes and horseback riding are great for multi-day adventures, and my favourite way to experience the Icelandic highlands and other remote areas like Hornstrandir.

Leaving Latravik to hike to Reykjafjordur, Hornstrandir

There’s no doubt that we value the wilderness for much more than it is. Lava, glaciers, rivers, moss and birch – they all have their own energy and influence on us. The weather also changes everything – the power, and sometimes danger, of a winter storm is incredibly humbling. I am allergic to everything green in an Icelandic summer, but simply seeing the endless green hay fields and crooked birch forests gives me energy. Swimming in natural geothermal springs and glacier-melt rivers are equally invigorating, and I couldn’t imagine a better place to have gotten stuck in during the covid-19 pandemic. The therapeutic landscapes of Iceland have certainly kept my mental and physical health afloat these last 16 months… so thank you, Iceland, my natural therapist.

Me Time Blog

Welcome to our Me Time Blog. Here we will create a space for sharing good energy and positive thinking. We will write about yoga, mindfulness and meditation practices, share stories from our retreats, and learn from each other through our own experiences with ´me time.´ Blog topics will include inspiring quotes, food for thought, tips on having a good day, relationship advice, and how to love yourself. Subscribe to our blog for words of advice or healing thoughts, everything published here is intended to spread love and kindness 🙂 Some days we will share exercises you can do at home, alone or with friends and family, or homework for you to do in your notebook. If you´ve ever come to a Me Time retreat, you can finally start filling in the notebook we gave you with these mindful writing practices!

thankful for soundbowls, incense and a bit of nature

For our very first blog, we wanted to share with you a list of things that we are grateful for:

We, at Me Time, are thankful for ´me time´ – the time we take for ourselves and share together at each retreat. We are thankful for every guest (and host) that shared a Me Time experience with us, and cannot wait to host more retreats next autumn/winter. We are also thankful for the summer season, a time when our retreats are on holiday, and the Múla Lodge is used for its original purpose – a luxury fishing lodge, which we are also so grateful for! Múlahús is like our second home, our winter cabin, and we can´t wait for more cozy, candle-lit nights by the fireplace. Thank you to all our friends and family who helped us make Me Time a reality, for faith in our creativity and ideas, and the space and time we needed to fulfil our entrepreneurial dreams.

Perhaps you would also like to share with us what you are thankful for these days in youre notebook or in a comment below 🙂 Thanks again, and namaste!